Restoration Advisory Board (RAB)
Technical Assistance for Public Participation Guidance

U.S. ARMY RESTORATION ADVISORY BOARD and TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR PUBLIC PARTICIPATION GUIDANCE
Prepared by U.S. Army Environmental Center

April 1998

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.0 INTRODUCTION
2.0 PURPOSE
3.0 RAB ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
3.1 Installation Commander
3.2 RAB Member
3.3 Major Army Command
3.4 Headquarters, Department of the Army
4.0 DETERMINING INTEREST
4.1 Criteria for Determining Sufficient Interest
4.2 Identify Initial Interest
4.3 Document Efforts
4.4 Re-Evaluate Interest on an On-going Basis
4.5 Technical Review Committees
5.0 ESTABLISHING A RAB
5.1 Selection of Co-Chairs
5.1.1 Installation Co-Chair
5.1.2 Community Co-Chair
5.2 Selection of Members
5.2.1 Army Installation Members
5.2.2 Regulatory Agency Members
5.2.3 Community Members
5.3 Changes in Membership
6.0 OPERATING PROCEDURES
6.1 Mission Statement
6.2 Member Attendance
7.0 ADJOURNING RABs
7.1 Continued Community Participation
7.2 Agreement by RAB Members
7.3 Adjournment Reporting
7.4 Re-establishing an Adjourned RAB
8.0 ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT
9.0 TECHNICAL SUPPORT
9.1 MACOM, MSC, USAEC, and Corps of Engineers
9.2 Preventive Medicine Activity/U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine
9.3 Technical Assistance for Public Participation
9.3.1 Eligible Applicants
9.3.2 Eligible TAPP Projects
9.3.3 Ineligible TAPP Projects
9.3.4 TAPP Process
9.3.5 Appeals
10.0 FUNDING
10.1 Administrative Support
10.2 Technical Support
10.2.1 Technical Support by Army Employees
10.2.2 TAPP
10.3 Public Participation
11.0 REPORTING
11.1 Monitoring RAB Activities with DSERTS
11.2 Reporting on TAPP
11.3 Mechanisms to Monitor RAB/TAPP Costs
11.3.1 RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets
11.3.2 IRP Obligation Plans/BRAC Work Plans
11.3.3 Defense Finance Accounting System (DFAS)
12.0 AVAILABLE GUIDANCE

ACRONYMS

FIGURE 1. Environmental Chain of Command for Restoration Advisory Board Appeals

ATTACHMENTS
Attachment 1 Sample Public Notice
Attachment 2 Sample Community Interest Form
Attachment 3 Sample Letter of Invitation
Attachment 4 Sample Fact Sheet
Attachment 5 Format for RAB Adjournment Report
Attachment 6 Sample RAB Adjournment Report
Attachment 7 TAPP Application Form, DD Form 2749
Attachment 8 RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets for RAB Administrative and TAPP Funding

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U.S. ARMY RESTORATION ADVISORY BOARD AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
FOR PUBLIC PARTICIPATION GUIDANCE

1.0 INTRODUCTION

A Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) is a forum composed of representatives of the Department of Defense (DoD), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state and local governments, tribal governments, and the affected community. RAB members provide their individual advice to the Installation Commander concerning environmental cleanup at military installations. The RAB should reflect the diverse makeup of the community, give all stakeholders the opportunity to participate in the cleanup process, monitor cleanup progress, and provide the opportunity to make the community views known to the decision-makers.

Technical Assistance for Public Participation (TAPP) is a new DoD program aimed at providing community members of RABs and Technical Review Committees (TRCs) with access to independent technical support through the use of government purchase orders. The TAPP program is designed to help community members understand scientific and engineering issues pertinent to the installation's environmental restoration activities.

2.0 PURPOSE

This document updates the October 1996 Army RAB guidance and includes protocols for establishing a RAB, as well as, procedures for determining community interest, funding, reporting, and RAB adjournment.

This document also describes the purpose of the TAPP program, how community members apply, approval procedures, contracting issues, and TAPP reporting requirements.

3.0 RAB ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 Installation Commander

The Installation Commander is responsible for executing restoration activities at his/her installation. Each active installation participating in the Army's Installation Restoration Program (IRP) and each Army Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) installation must determine community interest with regards to participating in a RAB. The Installation Commander is responsible for encouraging and identifying sufficient and sustained community interest in a RAB. If sufficient interest is expressed, the Installation Commander is responsible for establishing a RAB. If the Installation Commander determines that there is no initial community interest in establishing a RAB, he/she is responsible for a periodic re-evaluation of the community interest in establishing a RAB.

In May 1996, the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Logistics and Environment (ASA(I,L&E)) issued policy on the appropriate role of RABs in relative risk evaluation and sequencing of cleanup activities. Installations with RABs are directed to:

  • Inform RAB members regarding the relative risk process, the Army budgeting process, and how these affect the sequencing of restoration actions;
  • Encourage RABs to participate in the initial development and/or reassessment of relative risk evaluations of sites;
  • Develop budget requests within Army guidelines while considering individual RAB member's advice regarding sequencing;
  • Advise the RAB of funds provided, restoration projects funded, and what work is remaining; and
  • Provide the RAB with all relevant information on cleanup alternatives, including implications of land use choices and corresponding cleanup levels and remedies.

The Installation Commander must instruct the other RAB members with respect to the Army chain-of-command and the use of the chain-of-command to resolve disagreements or other problems (Figure 1.).

The Installation Commander approves any applications for TAPP brought forth by community members of the RAB/TRC.

For Army National Guard facilities, the Installation Commander is state-employed and is not responsible for executing the IRP. The National Guard Bureau (NGB) is the designated lead agency for the IRP at Army National Guard facilities and is responsible for execution, as well as, management of the IRP.

3.2 RAB Member

The RAB is intended to serve as a forum for the early and continued exchange of restoration related information among the community, installation, and regulatory agencies. To meet this objective, RAB members will:

  • Provide their individual advice to the installation, EPA, state regulatory agencies, and other government agencies on the environmental restoration activities and community involvement;
  • Address important issues related to environmental restoration, such as scope of studies, cleanup levels, and remedial action alternatives;
  • Review documents associated with environmental restoration activities, such as plans and technical reports;
  • Provide advice on priorities among sites or projects;
  • Identify applicable standards and in accordance with Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) propose cleanup levels consistent with planned land use;
  • Attend regular meetings that are open to the public and scheduled at times and locations that are convenient to community members;
  • Document decisions at meetings and make the information available to the general public; and
  • Interact with the Local Redevelopment Authority (LRA) or other land use planning bodies to discuss future land use issues relevant to environmental restoration decision making.

RAB members must realize and respect the Army chain-of-command to resolve differences (Figure 1.). All attempts should be made to resolve conflicts with the installation. If the conflict can not be resolved at the installation-level, community members of RABs are given the opportunity to raise issues, concerns and conflicts through the Army chain-of-command, if appropriate.

3.3 Major Army Command

The major Army commands (MACOMs) and, if applicable, their major subordinate commands (MSCs) are responsible for direction and management of restoration programs at installations under their command. Each MACOM ensures that an installation determines interest, documents lack of interest, programs and distributes funds for establishing and conducting a RAB or TAPP project, and reports on RAB activities and TAPP, if applicable.

The MACOM will identify a point of contact to assist in the resolution of differences between the RAB members and the installation. The MACOM point of contact is the first line of appeal for differences surfaced by community RAB members and the installation.

3.4 Headquarters, Department of the Army

The U. S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC), a Field Operating Agency of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (ACSIM), is the Army's program manager for the active sites IRP. The Office for Base Realignment and Closure (BRACO), within the office of the ACSIM, is the Army's program manager for the BRAC program. USAEC reviews RAB installation information for consistency with DoD policy and proposed RAB funding requirements for eligibility for reimbursement and consistency with approved IRP Obligation Plans and BRAC Work Plans. The USAEC is responsible for reporting installation-level RAB/TAPP data to other Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) staff elements and to the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Environmental Security (DUSD(ES)).

4.0 DETERMINING INTEREST

The Army strongly encourages local community involvement as early as possible during environmental investigations and cleanup actions at all Army sites. Involving the public is essential for receiving community input and maintaining community understanding and support for Army environmental cleanup actions. Each active Army installation participating in the IRP and each BRAC installation must determine community interest in establishing and participating in a RAB.

In the case of BRAC sites, it is DoD policy that those sites that involve transfer of property to the community must establish a RAB. For the remaining BRAC and active installations, the Army encourages RABs where community interest is sufficient and sustained.

                                  Figure 1

  ENVIRONMENTAL CHAIN-OF-COMMAND FOR RESTORATION ADVISORY BOARD APPEALS
                                
                                 ASA (I,L&E)

                                  DASA (ESOH)

                                    ACSIM

                       ODEP                      BRACO
						
              Active Installations       BRAC Installations

                                   USAEC

                                   MACOM

                           INSTALLATION COMMANDER

                               INSTALLATION RAB

By October 1, 1998, every Army installation with restoration activities ongoing or planned must determine if the community is interested in establishing a RAB or if there is sufficient interest to convert an existing TRC into a RAB.

4.1 Criteria for Determining Sufficient Interest

Criteria determining sufficient interest are:

  • Federal, state, or local government agencies formally request that a RAB be formed;
  • At least 50 local residents sign a petition requesting that a RAB be formed;
  • The Installation Commander determines that a RAB is needed; or
  • Installation closure involves transfer of property to the community.

4.2 Identify Initial Interest

The installation should use community involvement techniques to educate the community on RABs and solicit feedback on interest. These techniques could include coordinated surveys (telephone, focus groups, in person, or mail), advertisements, interviews, or public information meetings.

The first time an installation sets forth to determine community interest in establishing and participating in a RAB, the RAB status is reported as "Installation is in the process of determining interest in establishing a RAB". See Section 11.1 on Monitoring RAB Activities with the Defense Sites Environmental Restoration Tracking System (DSERTS).

4.3 Document Efforts

If an installation solicits for interest and finds that there is not enough support to establish a RAB, the installation must document its efforts to determine interest and attach documentation to the active installation's Installation Action Plan (IAP) or a BRAC installation's BRAC Cleanup Plan (BCP) Abstract. Documentation should include the result of the efforts, the conclusion that there was no interest, and the follow-up procedures to monitor the level of future interest for a RAB. Efforts to determine interest and the results of those efforts must be retained in the installation's Administrative Record for the restoration program.

After the installation determines there is no community interest in establishing a RAB, the RAB status is reported as "The community has expressed no sufficient, sustained interest in a RAB." See Section 11.1 on Monitoring RAB Activities with DSERTS.

4.4 Re-Evaluate Interest on an On-going Basis

If there is no interest in establishing a RAB, the installation must develop follow-up procedures to routinely monitor any changes in community interest and attach the procedures to the IAP or BCP Abstract, as appropriate.

The installation should re-evaluate community interest every two years, at a minimum. If a RAB has been adjourned due to lack of continued, sufficient, and sustained community interest, the installation must continue to monitor for any subsequent changes in community interest to revive the RAB.

4.5 Technical Review Committees (TRCs)

If an installation with an existing TRC determines that there is sufficient interest in establishing a RAB, the installation should proceed to convert the TRC to a RAB rather than creating a separate committee. A RAB complies with the 10 U.S. Code (USC) 2705(c) requirement for a TRC. Modifications to TRCs for conversion to RABs should include:

  • Adding additional representatives from the community nominated and
  • selected in coordination with regulators and affected community members;
  • Adding a Community Co-Chair selected by representatives of the community;
  • Making meetings open to the public; and
  • Obtaining information and views from the public early in the decision making process.

5.0 ESTABLISHING A RAB

A RAB should include representatives from the Army, the EPA, state environmental regulatory representatives, local Government representatives (city manager, mayor, environmental or health department officials, local reuse authority member), tribal governments, and members of the local community. This section describes a recommended process for selecting Army installation, regulatory agency, and community members of the RAB. This guidance complies with the intent and direction of DoD policy while providing flexibility for different circumstances that may exist at individual installations.

The RAB should be no larger than 20 individuals, but no smaller than is necessary to adequately reflect the diverse community interests regarding installation cleanup and closure. A RAB should focus on environmental restoration only and is not to be a forum for other community concerns. The RAB should refer non-cleanup issues, such as land re-use or operating permits, to the appropriate installation officials.

5.1 Selection of Co-Chairs

An Army representative and a member of the local community will jointly chair the RAB. The Installation and Community Co-Chair shall share leadership responsibilities. The RAB ground rules and operating procedures define the responsibilities of each Co-Chair.

5.1.1 Installation Co-Chair

The Installation Commander appoints the Installation Co-Chair. The Installation Commander may serve as the Co-Chair if he/she so desires. If other than the Installation Commander, the Co-Chair will be of sufficient experience and rank or grade to appropriately implement the RAB responsibilities with a direct reporting relationship to the Installation Commander.

5.1.2 Community Co-Chair

The community members of the RAB shall select the Community Co-Chair. The manner of selection is left to the members' discretion. However, the community should encourage selection of a Co-Chair, who has nothing to gain, either financially or politically, from RAB decisions.

5.2 Selection of Members

The Installation Co-Chair should ensure that the selection process is a cooperative effort with the regulators and affected community. Regardless of which process an installation chooses to use, it should be conducted in a fair and open manner.

5.2.1 Army Installation Members

In addition to the Installation Co-Chair, the Installation Commander may select an additional installation representative to serve on the RAB. The additional installation representative could be the BRAC Environmental Coordinator (BEC), environmental coordinator, public affairs officer, base transition coordinator, legal counsel, etc. If not selected to be the installation's representative, the commander may still require these individuals to attend the RAB meetings and provide support.

5.2.2 Regulatory Agency Members

The Installation Commander or Installation Co-Chair should contact the EPA and state regulatory agencies to request appointment of respective members to the RAB. To preserve continuity at installations modifying TRCs into RABs, regulatory representatives on the TRC should also serve as the RAB representatives. At closing installations, the regulatory representatives on the BRAC Cleanup Team (BCT) should also serve as the RAB representatives. At BRAC installations where support resources from DoD are not provided, EPA involvement in a RAB will be at the discretion of the appropriate EPA Regional Administrator.

5.2.3 Community Members

There is a five-step process for selecting community members:

STEP ONE: The Installation Commander (in consultation with the EPA, state and local officials) identifies the diverse community interests. Community interests may include, but are not limited to, local residents, the business community, homeowners associations, local environmental groups, environmental justice groups (low income and minority groups), local officials, health officials, senior citizens associations, civic groups, installation workers, and installation residents. For BRAC installations, membership should include a representative(s) of the local reuse committee.

STEP TWO: The Installation Commander (in consultation with the EPA, state and local officials) organizes a selection panel of community members from the diverse interest groups identified in STEP ONE to nominate RAB members who reflect a cross-section of the diverse interest groups.

OPTIONS FOR FORMING THE SELECTION PANEL. Community members should make up the selection panel and reflect the diverse interests identified in STEP ONE. Useful options for forming the selection panel include the following:

  • The Installation Commander (in consultation with EPA, state and local officials) organizes a selection panel of community members to nominate RAB members; or
  • The Installation Commander (in consultation with EPA, state and local officials) has a neutral facilitator establish the selection panel; or
  • The Installation Commander (in consultation with EPA, state and local officials) has community representatives choose the members of the selection panel; or
  • The Installation Commander (in consultation with EPA, state and local officials) places paid public notices in the local newspaper asking for volunteers to serve on the selection panel; or
  • The Installation Commander (in consultation with EPA, state and local officials) asks existing community members of the TRC to act as the selection panel; or
  • The Installation Commander, EPA, state and local representatives each nominate community members to serve on the selection panel.

STEP THREE: The selection panel identifies the diverse community interest groups that need representation in the RAB. The panel then develops a solicitation process and establishes criteria for selection of RAB members.

RECOMMENDED SOLICITATION PROCESS: The following process describes how to solicit for members from both the targeted interest groups and any other interested community members:

  • Announce participation opportunities through news releases and paid public notices (see the sample in Attachment 1);
  • Develop a community interest form to determine community concerns and participation interest (see Attachment 2);
  • Establish a time period for receipt of the community interest forms;
  • Mail letters of invitation (see Attachment 3), fact sheets (see Attachment 4) and community interest forms to those on the installation's existing mailing list as well as to the groups identified by the selection panel;
  • Place fact sheets and community interest forms in information repositories (public affairs office, local/school library, town center, office of public record); or
  • Hold an initial meeting about RABs to discuss purpose, member solicitation process, membership responsibilities; provide fact sheets and community interest forms.

After the designated solicitation period ends, the selection panel convenes to develop a list of suggested RAB members that reflect the diverse interests of the community. The panel uses community interest forms to develop this list. The selection panel submits the list of suggested RAB members to the Installation Commander for approval.

STEP FOUR: The Installation Commander (in consultation with EPA, state and local officials) will review and accept the list unless he/she determines that it is not representative of the diverse community interests. If the list is not an accurate representation, the Installation Commander will specify the weaknesses for correction and instruct the selection panel to develop a new list for review/approval. Once the list is approved, the selection panel will disband.

STEP FIVE: The installation should do the following to announce the RAB members:

  • Send letters to the selected RAB members to notify them of their selection, the names of all the RAB members, the date of the first RAB meeting, and the agenda/topics for the meeting;
  • Send letters to those who submitted community interest forms, announcing the names of the RAB members, thanking them for their interest, encouraging them to attend future RAB meetings; and
  • Send news releases to the local newspapers, television and radio stations, if appropriate, and place paid public notices in the local newspapers announcing the names of the RAB members, date of the first RAB meeting, and the agenda/topics for the meeting.

5.3 Changes in Membership

The RAB can change membership (additions and deletions) at any time the RAB deems necessary. Operating procedures should contain instructions for changing RAB membership and for considering resignations. Once the RAB members have been selected, the Installation Co-Chair should keep the remaining community interest forms on file for future reference. If RAB members resign in the future, the original community interest forms provide a potential source for new members. Resigning members can nominate new members as their replacement. The new members must, however, continue to reflect the diversity of community interests, including those of minority and low income groups.

6.0OPERATING PROCEDURES

When a RAB is established, RAB members must develop appropriate ground rules and operating procedures to ensure that the RAB maintains its focus on environmental restoration issues. The RAB should not become a sounding board for non-restoration environmental issues or other community concerns. Further, the rules should reflect that RABs are not advisory committees, as that term is used in the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), 5 USC Appendix 2. All advice and recommendations provided to the Government by RABs must be offered by the members in their individual capacities rather than by the consensus of the RAB. If RAB members determine consensus advice and recommendations are necessary, they should consult with legal counsel on FACA applicability.

6.1 Mission Statement

Each RAB should develop a mission statement that describes the overall purpose and goals and a set of operating procedures that govern meetings, membership terms, methods for dispute resolution, and participation of the public in meetings.

The RAB as a minimum will:

  • Conduct regular meetings at least quarterly with all meetings open to the public. Actively encourage public attendance and participation by holding RAB meetings at convenient times and locations within the community. Announce the meetings in appropriate local media, including the broadcast media, well in advance. Keep minutes of the meetings and make them available to the public through information repositories.
  • Develop, maintain, and use a mailing list of names and addresses of interested parties who wish to receive information on the cleanup process. RABs must ensure that information is provided to addressees in a timely manner.
  • Review, discuss, and evaluate a wide range of draft and final technical documents, status reports, and proposed and final plans related to the cleanup. The RAB will conduct these reviews within the time frames specified for review by appropriate regulatory agencies. No delays in the preparation of draft or final documents should result from the RAB's participation in the review process.
  • Identify potential project requirements and provide input on priorities among sites or projects.
  • In accordance with Section 121 of CERCLA, propose cleanup levels consistent with planned land use.

6.2 Member Attendance

To ensure ongoing, consistent involvement by community members, regular attendance at RAB meetings is necessary. The absence of a community member from three consecutive meetings may be considered cause for dismissal by vote of the majority of the RAB. If, after selection, any RAB member is unable to participate fully, the member should submit his/her resignation in writing to either RAB Co-Chair. Resigning members may nominate new-members as their replacement. The new members must, however, continue to reflect the diversity of community interests, including those of minority and low income groups.

7.0 ADJOURNING RABs

This adjournment guidance should be considered interim until final policy is developed through the administrative rulemaking process and published in the RAB Rule in accordance with 10 USC 2705.

When the restoration program at an installation nears completion or community interest in participating in a RAB wanes, an installation may consider adjourning its RAB. However, adjournment should not be an independent, unilateral decision on the part of the Army. The installation must make the decision to adjourn a RAB with unanimous agreement from the active RAB members and in consultation with the community as a whole.

Adjournment of a RAB may be appropriate under the following circumstances:

  • An active or BRAC installation no longer has an environmental restoration program. The RAB may be adjourned if response actions for all sites on the installation are complete with regulator concurrence. Since RABs are only to address restoration issues at an installation, at the conclusion of the restoration program the RAB should adjourn.
  • An active or BRAC installation has all remedies in place and the remedies are operating properly and successfully. If all remedies are in place and operating at an installation, the RAB may adjourn because all restoration decisions have been made. However, there may be post-Record of Decision (ROD)/Decision Document (DD) cleanup activities of interest to the RAB. In those cases where the RAB wants to adjourn when remedies are in place, the installation or MACOM (for BRAC where the installation no longer exists) can make a decision to adjourn a RAB in accordance with the procedures of this section.

Examples of post-ROD/DD activities of potential interest to a RAB include, but are not limited to, Five Year Reviews, remedy performance evaluations, monitoring to evaluate natural attenuation decisions, decisions to discontinue or decrease treatment systems, technical impracticability waivers, maintenance and enforcement of institutional controls, demonstrations that the remedy is operating properly and successfully, and site close out reports.

  • There is no longer sufficient, sustained community interest in the RAB. If a RAB adjourns because there is no longer sufficient, sustained community interest, the installation must ensure that it's overall community involvement program provides for continued stakeholder input and the installation must continue to monitor for any subsequent changes in community interest to revive the RAB.

7.1 Continued Community Participation

Unless a RAB is adjourned because there is no longer a restoration program at an installation (and therefore no longer restoration issues for the community to address), the Army must present a plan to the RAB that indicates how community participation will be conducted after adjournment. Prior to making the decision to adjourn, the installation should consider the RAB's advice on ways to improve or ensure that communication with the public continues.

7.2 Agreement by RAB Members

Adjournment of a RAB will not be an independent, unilateral decision on the part of the Army. All active members of the RAB must agree to the adjournment. If the RAB members decide they do not want to adjourn, the members may agree to decrease the frequency of RAB meetings rather than to adjourn. If the installation and the RAB members are in disagreement or if the active RAB members are not unanimious in their decision to adjourn, the parties should try to resolve this issue at the installation-level. If resolution cannot be reached, the issue should be raised up to the next level of the Army environmental chain-of-command for resolution, the MACOM (see Figure 1).

7.3 Adjournment Reporting

Once a decision to adjourn has been made, the rationale must be documented, RAB members and the community as a whole must be informed. Community notification may include publication of a notice in the newspaper of general distribution in the affected locale. The installation must ensure that information, such as the results of long term environmental monitoring, is available to the community in repositories or other outreach mechanisms. RAB adjournment information should be retained in the Administrative Record for the restoration program.

The Army requires that an adjournment report be prepared when the installation decides to adjourn its RAB. At a minimum, the adjournment report must include;

  • Reason the RAB is adjourning,
  • Summary of the environmental restoration activities and status of the program at time of adjournment,
  • Summary of RAB activities,
  • Any continuing notification requirements to the RAB members,
  • Any continuing community participation requirements,
  • Statement that the RAB members agree to adjourn,
  • Signatures of the Installation Co-Chair and the Community Co-Chair and, if appropriate, the members of the BCT, and
  • Approval by the Installation Commander or depending on the status of a installation closing, the MACOM designated installation coordinator or the MACOM Environmental Coordinator would sign for the Installation Commander.

Attachment 5 to this guidance contains the format for an Army RAB Adjournment Report. Attachment 6 is an example RAB Adjournment Report.

Notification Requirements

Upon approval of the RAB Adjournment Report, the Installation Commander must notify their MACOM and through the chain-of-command the DASA(ESOH). The USAEC requires one copy of each Adjournment Report.

7.4 Re-establishing an Adjourned RAB

An installation may re-establish or re-activate its RAB at any time if the level of community interest in restoration issues is sufficient. The installation commander should determine if the adjourned RAB should be re-activated or if a new RAB should be established in accordance with DoD and Army criteria.

8.0 ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT

Activities directly related to the operation of the RAB shall qualify as administrative support provided by the Army. The Installation Co-Chair will ensure that administrative support is available to the RAB using either in-house personnel or contractual support. An installation's Public Affairs Office should be involved in supporting the RAB. In addition, the USAEC's Public Affairs Office can provide support to installations upon request. Examples of administrative functions that that require support include development of a RAB mission statement and operating procedures, organization and facilitation of RAB meetings, documentation and distribution of meeting minutes, establishment of a mailing list, and mailing relevant information.

9.0 TECHNICAL SUPPORT

To ensure that RAB members clearly understand the issues involved in environmental cleanup activities, some level of technical support is available from the Army, if necessary. Examples of the types of technical support that could be provided include updates and status reports on ongoing restoration programs or efforts, explanation of technical and risk assessment data, explanation of the relative risk site evaluation procedures and results, planning and facilitating site visits, and preparation of briefing packages and handouts.

9.1 MACOM, MSC, USAEC, and Corps of Engineers

Technical support is often available to the RAB from the MACOMs/MSCs, the USAEC, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. These organizations may provide in-house and contractual support to explain technical data and related issues to the RAB. In many cases, the restoration contractor already performing work at the installation can provide technical support. Installations should determine the type and level of contractual support available from current contracts when providing technical support to the RAB.

9.2 Preventive Medicine Activity/U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine

The Preventive Medicine Activity at an installation has a staff of physicians and environmental health specialists that may be available to support a RAB. The U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) also has a staff of environmental health professionals (including scientists, geologists, engineers, and physicians) to assist a RAB.

The installation Preventive Medicine Activity and USACHPPM can provide support to the RABs in the following ways:

  • Preventive Medicine personnel at an installation provide first line support to the RABs as directed by U.S. Army Regulation (AR) 200-1 and Department of the Army Pamphlet (DA Pam) 40-578. Local Preventive Medicine personnel can provide day-to-day contact with the RAB members and attend meetings on a routine basis. The local Preventive Medicine Activity can answer health-related questions and also collect public health and risk assessment/risk communications issues for the Office of the Surgeon General OTSG).
  • At installations without Preventive Medicine Activities, environmental professionals at the USACHPPM Direct Support Activities (DSAs) can provide support for the RABs by attending meetings and collecting health assessment issues. At installations with Preventive Medicine Activities, the DSAs can also provide consultative support to the Preventive Medicine Activity as well as to the RAB.
  • USACHPPM's Environmental Health Risk Assessment and Risk Communication Program can provide support to the RABs by providing assistance on technical issues regarding human and environmental risk. This USACHPPM program can also provide risk communication support to the RABs through their consultation and training services that include advisory, technical, and logistical support of public meetings, public exhibits, and open dialogue sessions.

9.3 Technical Assistance for Public Participation

The Technical Assistance for Public Participation (TAPP) program provides community members of RABs and TRCs access to independent technical support through the use of government purchase orders. Community members of the RAB or TRC apply to the Installation Commander for independent assistance in interpreting scientific and engineering issues with regard to the nature of environmental hazards and restoration activities at the installation.

The principal criteria for obtaining TAPP is that the technical assistance is likely to contribute to:

  • The efficiency, effectiveness, or timeliness of environmental restoration activities at the installation, or
  • Community acceptance of environmental restoration activities at the installation.

9.3.1 Eligible Applicants

To receive independent technical assistance from the Army under the TAPP program, RABs and TRCs must propose a project and apply to the Installation Commander. Only community members (not government members) of recognized RABs/TRCs are eligible to apply for independent technical assistance from the Army using the TAPP authority. Also, there must be a minimum of three community members on the RAB/TRC to apply for TAPP. Any request for TAPP must represent the wishes of the majority of the community members and the RAB/TRC must certify a majority request on the TAPP application.

9.3.2 Eligible TAPP Projects

The following types of technical assistance projects are eligible for funding by the Army under the TAPP program:

  • Interpret technical documents - review and interpret, plans and technical documents such as site studies, risk assessments, and health assessments.
  • Assess technologies - explain the function and implications of those technologies selected to investigate or clean up sites at the installation (e.g., understand how vapor extraction works and under what conditions the technology is appropriate).
  • Participate in Relative Risk Site Evaluations (RRSEs) - contribute to DoD's relative risk evaluation process for specific sites.
  • Interpret health implications - interpret the potential health implications of site contaminants and exposure scenarios.
  • Certain types of training - technical trainers on specific restoration issues may be appropriate in circumstances where RAB members need education or supplemental information on restoration projects. TAPP may be used to obtain training to assist the community in understanding processes, health effects, or alternative technologies. (Note: In most cases Federal or state agency personnel can provide training.)

9.3.3 Ineligible TAPP Projects

The following types of technical assistance projects are not eligible for funding by the Army under the TAPP program:

  • Activities associated with non-restoration issues, such as compliance, are not eligible for TAPP because compliance activities are not in the purview of the RAB/TRC,
  • Litigation or underwriting legal actions such as paying attorney fees,
  • Political activity and lobbying as defined by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-122, "Cost principles for Non-Profit Organizations,"
  • Other activities inconsistent with the cost principles stated in OMB Circular A-122,
  • Generation of new primary data, such as well drilling and split sampling. It is the responsibility of the Army in coordination with the regulatory agencies to develop investigation strategies to ensure potential hazards are adequately characterized. If a RAB identifies a circumstance where additional data collection may be necessary, these concerns should be communicated to the installation, or to the appropriate regulatory agency.
  • Conduct disputes with the Army over remedy selection or any other aspects of the restoration program, or to reopen final Army CERCLA decisions.
  • Epidemiological or health studies, such as blood or urine testing, and
  • Community outreach, including reproducing reports, conducting site tours, and obtaining meeting rooms.

9.3.4 TAPP Process

STEP ONE Identification of Need

When RAB/TRC community members initially determine a desire for independent technical assistance, they must demonstrate that the technical expertise necessary for the proposed project is not available through the Federal, state, or local agencies responsible for overseeing environmental restoration at the installation. RAB/TRC community members must first consider the following sources of assistance:

  • Contractors already working at the installation,
  • Federal and state environmental personnel responsible for the IRP or BRAC Environmental Restoration Program at the installation, or
  • Volunteer sources from within the community (e.g., local universities or local or state environmental organizations).

Upon determining that other sources of assistance are unavailable or unlikely to contribute to the community acceptance of environmental restoration activities at the installation, the RAB/TRC must notify the installation of its intent to pursue TAPP. The community members of the RAB/TRC then define the scope of the independent technical assistance, determining that it meets a genuine need of the RAB/TRC, meets the eligibility criteria, and is limited in scope to the available resources.

STEP TWO Application

Once the scope of the proposed TAPP project has been defined, the RAB/TRC community members must prepare and submit a formal application (DD Form 2749) specifying the type of assistance required and, if possible, one or more sources for this assistance. The project description should contain sufficient detail to enable the Army to determine the nature and eligibility of the project, identify potential providers, estimate costs, and prepare a Scope of Work (SOW) to begin the procurement process. The community members must identify a single point of contact for communication with the installation regarding the TAPP procurement process and confirm that the project is the result of a majority decision by the community members of the RAB.

The Installation Co-Chair reviews the application to ensure that it is complete, describes an eligible project, and will likely be within budget. The Installation Co-Chair, in coordination with the RAB/TRC, prepares a draft SOW. The TAPP application, with the draft SOW, is forwarded to the Installation Commander for approval. See Attachment 7 for a copy of the DD Form 2749.

STEP THREE Approval

The Installation Commander or other appropriate decision authority will consider the TAPP request and approve or deny the TAPP application. As part of the approval process, the Installation Commander determines that the proposed project conforms to eligibility requirements, the community has sought other avenues of assistance prior to applying for TAPP, and funding is available. When other avenues for assistance exist, but the community members desire an independent provider, the Installation Commander must assess whether providing assistance will enhance the restoration program and improve community support. TAPP applications that fail to meet the requirements relating to relevance to the restoration activities at the installation will be denied.

If approved, the Installation Commander forwards the request to the contracting office for procurement. If denied, the Installation Commander must inform the RAB/TRC, indicate the reason for the denial, and recommend alternatives for achieving the desired assistance. The RAB/TRC may then decide whether to reapply.

STEP FOUR Procurement

The Installation Commander forwards the approved TAPP request to the installation procurement office/support agency contracting office. The installation procurement office/supporting agency contracting office will award the contract to and manage the contract with the selected assistance provider and the Installation Co-Chair will serve as a liaison between the RAB community members and the installation procurement office.

Finding a Potential Assistance Provider

The RAB/TRC community members may nominate potential assistance providers for the proposed TAPP project on the TAPP application or the installation procurement office may locate potential providers. The RAB/TRC may have specific criteria in mind for the provider to demonstrate.

Potential assistance providers must have:

  • Knowledge of hazardous or toxic waste issues and/or laws;
  • Academic training in a relevant discipline; and
  • Ability to review, understand, and put technical information into terms understandable to lay persons.

Potential assistance providers should have:

  • Experience working on hazardous or toxic waste problems;
  • Experience in making technical presentations;
  • Demonstrated writing skills; and
  • Previous experience working with community groups.

If the contracting office selects a provider different from one nominated by the RAB/TRC, the Army must inform the RAB/TRC and determine whether they wish to proceed with the procurement.

Simplified Acquisition Procedures

Because of the dollar levels involved in the procurement, the installation procurement office/support agency contracting office will generally process the approved TAPP request as a purchase order using Simplified Acquisition Procedures. Benefits of using Simplified Acquisition Procedures are that solicitations can be shorter, contracting methods are more direct, payment methods are quicker, and documentation generally less burdensome.

Factors other than price, such as prior performance or the demonstration of other specialized skills, may be considered and require only a minimal amount of documentation using Simplified Acquisition Procedures.

The RAB/TRC may wish to use a sole-source procurement. The Simplified Acquisition Procedures make this process simpler than in larger contracts. Signature authority rests with the Contracting Officer for contracts up to $100,000. Furthermore, documentation requirements are less stringent, requiring only notations in the record as to why a sole source procurement was necessary, but not requiring a complete justification document. The Contracting Officer should be prepared to work with the RAB/TRC, through the Installation Co-Chair, to ensure that the SOW does not contain specifications that would unnecessarily or unfairly exclude otherwise qualified respondents.

Independent Government Cost Estimates

The Independent Government Cost Estimate is developed by the Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) based on the SOW. The installation procurement office must be aware of the source and limits of funding TAPP projects. The RAB/TRC should be notified if the government cost estimate exceeds the planned budget. Unless a waiver to the current policy limits on TAPP expenditures (see 10.2.2) is warranted, the procurement as proposed would not proceed. The RAB/TRC community members may wish to modify the SOW so that the scope more closely matches the available resources and resubmit the procurement request.

Contracting Officer's Representative

The COR directs the technical aspects of the contract, and assesses the performance of the contractor at the conclusion of the project. The Installation Co-Chair will in most instances perform the function of the COR. It is important to remember that, although the RAB/TRC initiated the project and has a great stake in its outcome, the contract is a government contract and the contractor must receive direction from the government Contracting Officer. The COR must ensure that the contractor understands this relationship. Likewise, it is important that the RAB/TRC understand their relationship to the contractor. New tasks or changes to the work schedule or scope must come through the COR to the Contracting Officer because the community cannot task the contractor directly. Communications between the community members of the RAB and the contractor could lead to problems if the community directs the assistance provider to conduct work not identified in the purchase order agreement. Therefore, either the contracting officer or the COR shall be present during any such discussions.

STEP FIVE Assistance Provided

When the government purchase order is awarded the selected independent contractor will work with the community members of the RAB/TRC through the COR to provide the requested assistance.

STEP SIX Reporting

Each RAB/TRC that receives TAPP must submit a report to the installation at project completion. This report must indicate the amount of TAPP funds obligated by fiscal year, and an evaluation for each project concerning whether the TAPP assisted the community in participating in the restoration program.

9.3.5 Appeals

Disagreements may occur between the Army and the community at several points during the TAPP process. For instance, the Installation Commander may deny an application for TAPP because the budget cannot accommodate the cost near the end of a fiscal year or the RAB/TRC may dispute the findings of the Contracting Officer regarding the proposed provider. In the event that a dispute arises, the community members of the RAB/TRC may wish to appeal a decision by the Army. The following general operating principles apply when a RAB/TRC wishes to appeal a decision:

  • Inherently government functions may not be appealed,
  • Eliminating disagreements and roadblocks should be emphasized,
  • Appeals should be resolved quickly,
  • Appeals should be resolved at the lowest level possible, and
  • Appeals should be resolved within the Army.

Typically, the appeals process begins with the Installation Commander (2-week review); then to the MACOM (30-day review); and finally to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Environment, Safety and Occupational Health (DASA(ESOH)) (30-day review) (Figure 1.). For all Army RABs, the DASA(ESOH) is the last authority for any appeal concerning TAPP.

Ground rules, as they relate to the appeals process, include:

  • The majority of RAB/TRC community members must agree to the appeal,
  • The RAB/TRC must appoint a single spokesperson,
  • Written justification, submitted to the installation commander, must accompany the appeal.
  • If the installation commander chooses not to support the appeal, he or she must endorse the appeal to the next higher level of the chain-of-command with rationale for denying the appeal.
  • Appeals must follow the appeal process and cannot skip or circumvent command levels. At each command level, both the appeal and commanders' endorsement(s) must be considered.

These ground rules are designed to speed the appeals process and to ensure that the project or decision being appealed has the support of the majority of RAB community members.

10.0 FUNDING

10.1 Administrative Support

An installation may require funding to establish and operate a RAB. Costs incurred by an installation to operate a RAB are considered RAB administrative support and are funded as program management using the Environmental Restoration, Army (ER,A) Account or the Base Closure Account (BCA). An installation should review the definition of RAB administrative funding when identifying RAB funding requirements.

  • Activities directly related to the operation and establishment of the RAB shall qualify as administrative expenses. Such expenses include member recruitment, meeting announcements, meeting logistics, development of mission statements and operating procedures, facilitators (including translators), preparation of meeting agendas, materials and minutes, document reproduction for RAB members, maintenance of a RAB mailing list and mailing relevant information, and orientation training. Also included are contractor expenses specifically in support administration of the RAB.
  • RAB administrative expenses do not include general community involvement expenses, such as preparation of fact sheets or other information materials for public distribution, costs of public meetings, mailings, responding to public comments on the restoration program, or repository costs.

Other ineligible RAB administrative expense activities include:

  • Salaries for DoD personnel including contractor employee salaries at the installation;
  • Dedicated equipment, such as computers, software, facsimile machines, telephone lines or access or electronic mail for community RAB members;
  • Renting dedicated office space and providing administrative support services to community members of the RAB;
  • Printed stationary and personal business cards;
  • Temporary Duty (TDY)/travel, conference attendance or fees for community members; and
  • Compensation to RAB members for meeting attendance, work hours lost, time invested in reviewing and commenting on documents, travel to RAB meetings, or long distance telephone calls.

Costs associated with administrative support to the RABs are eligible for funding from either the ER,A Account or BCA, whichever is appropriate. MACOMs will budget RAB support from their allocation of IRP or BRAC environmental program management funds.

To obtain necessary funding, the installations must identify appropriate RAB funding requirements to their MACOM. Attachment 8 contains RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets for reporting RAB administration funding requirements and potential TAPP requirements. Each installation with a RAB must submit RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets in the spring when the MACOMs identify program management requirements to obtain funding levels for the following fiscal year. For both active and BRAC installations, the installation identifies its RAB funding requirements on either the IRP Obligation Plan or BRAC Work Plan. See Section 11.3 Mechanisms to Monitor RAB/TAPP Costs.

10.2 Technical Support

10.2.1 Technical Support by Army Employees

Technical support services may be available to the RAB from the installation, MACOMs/MSCs, the USAEC, USACHPPM, Preventive Medicine Activities, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers or installation contractors. These organizations may have in-house expertise that the installation and RAB can access to explain technical data and related issues. Technical services provided by such Army organizations as USAEC, USACHPPM, or Corps of Engineers employees are not considered RAB administrative support (as defined previously).

In-house Army technical support should not be included on the RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets, the IRP Obligation Plan, or the BRAC Work Plan as RAB administrative expenses. Furthermore, reimbursement for services from these activities would normally be inappropriate as their costs are either centrally funded or project related. Installations and MACOMs that require funds to obtain in-house technical services should contact the USAEC, Environmental Restoration Division, Program Management Branch.

10.2.2 TAPP

Funding for independent technical assistance for RAB/TRC community members under the TAPP program may be necessary on a case-by-case basis. There is no separate appropriation for TAPP. TAPP projects will be funded from an installation's allocation of ER,A or BCA funds for program management. TAPP is not a grant or direct funding to RABs/TRCs, nor is it a blank check to use at the RABs/TRCs discretion.

Current policy limits TAPP expenditures for each installation with a RAB/TRC to an annual maximum of $25,000 or 1 percent of the cost to complete restoration activities, whichever is less, and a lifetime maximum of $100,000 per installation.

To obtain necessary funding, the installations must identify appropriate TAPP requirements to their MACOM. Each installation with a RAB must submit RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets in the spring when the MACOMs identify program management requirements to obtain funding approval for the following fiscal year. For both active sites and BRAC installations, TAPP funding requirements are identified on the IRP Obligation Plan or the BRAC Work Plan. The MACOMs will budget for TAPP support to RABs/TRCs from their allocation of IRP or BRAC environmental program management funds. See Section 11.3 Mechanisms to Monitor RAB/TAPP Costs

Waivers.

Waivers to the $100,000 total and $25,000 annual funding limits may be approved by DASA(ESOH). Requests for waivers are initiated by the RAB/TRC community members and forwarded by endorsement with recommendations by the installation commander through the chain-of command to DASA(ESOH). The following considerations may affect the granting of a waiver:

- The size or complexity of the restoration project,

- The nature and extent of contamination,

- The level of restoration activity at the installation,

- The size and diversity of the affected community, and

- Funding received by the community from other Federal sources.

10.3 Public Participation

Public participation on the RAB will be strictly voluntary. The Army will not provide financial support to the public members for their services nor will members be compensated for work hours lost, or time invested in review and commentary on documents. The Installation Co-Chair must ensure that the public clearly understands this fact during the member recruitment process and prior to any final commitment by a public representative to serve on the RAB.

11.0 REPORTING

Section 324 of the FY96 Defense Authorization Act requires that DoD provide an annual RAB report on funding and activities, including TAPP. To meet these reporting requirements, the DASA(ESOH) summarizes RAB and TAPP data at the Army's semi-annual In-Process Reviews with DUSD(ES). MACOMs summarize the status of RABs and TAPP during the quarterly IRP Program Execution Reviews and the semi-annual BRAC Work Plan Reviews. As it is Army policy that all installations with a restoration program determine community interest in establishing and participating in a RAB, installations reporting no attempt to establish RABs will receive particular notice in these reports.

The Army collects RAB activity data from installations using the Defense Sites Environmental Restoration Tracking System (DSERTS). TAPP results are reported, as appropriate, when DSERTS is updated and submitted to MACOMs and the USAEC. Funding data is collected using RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets, IRP Obligation Plans, BRAC Work Plans, and the Defense Finance Accounting System (DFAS) RAB and TAPP Army Management Structure (AMS) codes.

11.1 Monitoring RAB Activities with DSERTS

The Army monitors RAB activities with the spring and fall DSERTS data submissions. DUSD(ES) requires reporting on the following seven RAB data elements that the Army collects using the DSERTS. RAB data in DSERTS must be reviewed and updated for each DSERTS submission to ensure the most accurate status. For example, if after follow-up monitoring a community's interest changes and a RAB is established, a RAB's community representation changes, or if RAB activities and advice expand, DSERTS is to be updated to reflect those changes.

Item 1: Unique Federal facility identification number.

Item 2: The date a RAB was established. The year and month in which the RAB was established at the installation.

A RAB is considered established when the Community Co-Chair has been selected and the first meeting involving community members has been held.

Item 3: The reason a RAB is not needed. Every Army installation with a restoration program must determine interest in a RAB. For every installation in DSERTS where a RAB has not been formed, DUSD(ES) requires a reason that a RAB has not been established. The following are standard reasons in DSERTS:

A. Installation located in remote area, no affected community.

B. Installation Commander or other DoD Component official has determined that a RAB is not needed.

C. The community has expressed no sufficient, sustained interest in a RAB.

D. Lack of outstanding cleanup issues or activities does not warrant establishment of a RAB.

E. Installation or tenant activity is supported by another RAB.

F. DoD does not have cleanup lead at site (e.g., FUDS).

G. Installation has not attempted to establish a RAB.

H. Installation is in the process of determining interest in establishing a RAB.

 

By October 1, 1998, the DSERTS database for all Army installations must reflect a date that the RAB was established or a Code of A through F. All Army installations are required to determine community interest in establishing and participating in a RAB before October 1, 1998. After October 1, 1998, any Code G or H in DSERTS will be questioned.

Item 4: RAB Community Representation. Members from the following segments of the community are participating in the RAB. Identify all that apply.

A. Local residents/community members.

B. Installation residents.

C. Local environmental groups/activists.

D. Business community.

E. Low income and minority.

F. Local government officials.

G. Other.

Item 5: RAB Activity. The RAB has participated in the following activities. Identify all that apply.

A. Reviewed plans and technical documents.

B. Provided comments or advice.

C. Received training.

D. Established RAB operating procedures.

E. Participated in the development or review of RRSEs.

F. Provided advice on the scope of work and schedule for studies and cleanups.

G. Improved installation credibility.

H. Established partnerships with stakeholders.

I. Developed How-to information or Lessons Learned.

Item 6: RAB Advice. The RAB has provided advice in the following areas. Identify all that apply.

A. Scope of studies.

B. Work Plan Priorities.

C. Site priorities.

D. Relative Risk Evaluation.

E. Remedy Selection.

F. Study or cleanup schedule.

G. Future Land use.

H. Other.

Item 7: Reasons RAB was Adjourned. If the RAB adjourned, the year and month is indicated. In addition, one of the following reasons is required:

A. The installation no longer has an environmental restoration program.

B. All environmental restoration remedies are in place and are operating properly and

successfully.

C. There is no longer sufficient, sustained community interest.

11.2 Reporting on TAPP

When an installation provides support to the RAB or TRC through the TAPP program, the installation must report on the results of the TAPP project. The report must be based on the RAB/TRC report to the installation and it must contain the following information:

- Installation Name,

- Name of the Assistance Provider,

- Cost of the project,

- Duration of the project,

- Short description of the scope of the project,

- Short description of the results of the project,

- Any technical actions taken because project results conflict with previous Army views,

- RAB/TRC satisfaction with the project,

- Any problems/issues that came up during the TAPP process, and

- Resolution of those problems/issues.

Installations submit this report, through their MACOM to the USAEC with the updated DSERTS data. The TAPP report will be submitted to the DUSD(ES) at semi-annual In-Process Reviews. The results of a TAPP project should be shared with the community as a whole and the TAPP report should be retained in the Administrative Record for the restoration program.

11.3 Mechanisms to Monitor RAB/TAPP Costs

DUSD(ES) requires reporting on past and projected RAB administrative costs and TAPP funding. The Army identifies projected RAB administrative costs and potential TAPP requirements using RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets, IRP Obligation Plans, and BRAC Work Plans. Past RAB and TAPP funding is tracked using IRP Obligation Plans, BRAC Work Plans and the DFAS RAB and TAPP AMS codes.

11.3.1 RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets

Installations must identify FY+1 RAB and potential TAPP funding requirements in the Spring using a RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheet (Attachment 8). This form is transmitted to the USAEC through the MACOMs when the MACOMs identify their FY+1 program management requirements.

RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets identify FY+1 requirements to determine interest in RABs. Any installation that initially determined there was no community interest in establishing and participating in a RAB, but is conducting follow-up community interest monitoring should complete a RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheet breaking out costs by eligible task.

RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets identify FY+1 requirements to establish a RAB. Any installation that will establish a RAB in the FY+1 should complete a RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheet breaking out costs by eligible task.

RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets identify FY+1 requirements to support an established RAB. Any installation with a RAB that requires administrative support must complete a RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheet, breaking out costs by eligible task.

RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets identify FY+1 potential TAPP requirements. It will not always be possible to identify potential TAPP requirements until RAB/TRC community members identify interest in a TAPP. Based on input from the RAB/TRC community members, any installation that may require program management funds for TAPP should complete the RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheet.

11.3.2 IRP Obligation Plans/BRAC Work Plans

Even though RAB and TAPP funding is program management, to track at the installation-level, RAB administrative costs and TAPP requirements must be reflected in the installation's IRP Obligation Plan and the BRAC Work Plan. Any RAB administrative costs and potential TAPP requirements identified on the RAB/TAPP Cost Worksheets must be included as a separate line item in the installation's IRP Obligation Plan or BRAC Work Plan.

11.3.3 Defense Finance Accounting System (DFAS)

The Army collects RAB administrative funding and TAPP funding using the DFAS AMS codes.

For the IRP, the AMS code for RAB support is 493008.1A. The AMS code for RAB support on the BCA will be unique for each BRAC installation. BCA AMS codes for RAB administration are found in the DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-(FY), Chapter 4.

For the IRP, the AMS code for TAPP is 493008.1C. The AMS code for TAPP on the BCA will be unique for each BRAC installation. BCA AMS codes for TAPP are found in the DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-(FY), Chapter 4.

12.0 AVAILABLE GUIDANCE

  • Rule -- Final Rule on Technical Assistance for Public Participation, Federal Register, February 2, 1998. Internet http://www.dtic.mil/envirodod/rab/61fedreg-tapp.html.
  • Guidance -- DERP/BRAC Environmental Restoration Program Management Guidance, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Environmental Security), March 1998. Internet http://www.denix.osd.mil/denix/Public/ES-Programs/Cleanup/DERP/guide.html
  • Resource -- Directory of Restoration Advisory Boards (RAB), Department of Defense, January 1998. Internet http://www.dtic.mil/envirodod/rab/intro.html
  • Resource -- DoD Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) Resource Book, September 1996. Internet http://www.dtic.mil/envirodod/rab/rabresource.
  • Rule - Proposed Rule on Restoration Advisory Boards, Federal Register, August 6, 1996. Internet http://www.dtic.mil/envirodod/rab/rab_fedr.html.
  • Fact Sheet - Updating Your RAB to Meet BRAC Needs, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Environmental Security), June 1996. Internet http://www.dtic.mil/envirodod/brac/rabs.html.
  • Army Policy -- Memorandum from the ASA(I,L&E), dated 7 May 96, subject: Issuance of Army Policy - The Role of Restoration Advisory Boards (RAB)s in Environmental Cleanup. Internet http://www.denix.osd.mil/denix/Public/Policy/Army/IRP/rab-role-ec.html or http://www.cedar.ca.gov/military/armyrab.html.
  • Principles -- Final Report Of The Federal Facilities Environmental Restoration Dialogue Committee, Consensus Principles and Recommendations for Improving Federal Facilities Cleanup, April 1996. Internet http://www.epa.gov/swerffrr/ferdcrpt/toc.htm.
  • Guidance -- Restoration Advisory Board Implementation Guidelines, DoD and EPA, September 1994. Internet http://www.dtic.mil/envirodod/rab/finalrab.html.

ACRONYMS

ACSIM Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management
AMS Army Management Structure
AR U.S. Army Regulation
ASA(I,L&E) Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Logistics and Environment

BCA Base Closure Account
BCP BRAC Cleanup Plan
BCT BRAC Cleanup Team
BEC BRAC Environmental Coordinator
BRAC Base Realignment and Closure
BRACO Base Realignment and Closure Office
BTC Base Transition Coordinator

CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act
COR Contracting Officer's Representative

DA PAM Department of the Army Pamphlet
DASA(ESOH) Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health
DD Decision Document
DFAS Defense Finance Accounting System
DoD Department of Defense
DSA USACHPPM Direct Support Activities
DSERTS Defense Sites Environmental Restoration Tracking System
DUSD(ES) Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Environmental Security

EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
ER,A Environmental Restoration, Army

FACA Federal Advisory Committee Act
FOA Field Operating Agency
FY Fiscal year

IAP Installation Action Plan
IRP Installation Restoration Program

LRA Local Redevelopment Authority

MACOM Major Army Command
MSC Major Army Subordinate Command

NGB National Guard Bureau

ODEP Office of the Director of Environmental Programs
OMB Office of Management and Budget
OTSG Office of the Surgeon General

RAB Restoration Advisory Board
ROD Record of Decision
RRSE Relative Risk Site Evaluation

SOW Statement of Work

TAPP Technical Assistance for Public Participation
TRC Technical Review Committee

USAEC U.S. Army Environmental Center
USACHPPM U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine
USC U.S. Code

ATTACHMENT 1

SAMPLE PUBLIC NOTICE

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT (Fort X, Point of Contact, and Telephone Number)

Fort X Plans to Establish a
Restoration Advisory Board

CITY, STATE - - Fort X is establishing a Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) and is seeking participants to be part of this RAB. The purpose of the RAB is to promote community involvement by giving the public the opportunity to regularly review progress and participate in dialogue with the decision-makers on Fort X's environmental restoration process.

The RAB will be made up of Army, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and state of (Name of State) representatives, as well as, members of the local community. The RAB will be Co-chaired by an Army and community representative. The community members of the RAB will select the Community Co-Chair. The RAB will meet on a (monthly? quarterly?) basis and the meetings will be open to the public. Public participation on the RAB will be strictly voluntary. The Army will not provide financial support to the public members for their services nor will members be compensated for work hours lost, or time invested.

This first meeting to discuss the RAB membership is scheduled for (PLACE, DATE, AND TIME). Fact sheets and community interest surveys are available to the public in the information repositories (NAMES AND LOCATIONS OF THE REPOSITORIES) and will also be distributed at the meeting. Interested RAB participants should be willing to attend all RAB meetings (which could last between two to four hours each) and be willing to devote ample time to review Army documents within prescribed time frames. For more information on participating in the RAB or obtaining a community interest survey, call (Name and telephone number of Point of Contact).

ATTACHMENT 2

SAMPLE COMMUNITY INTEREST FORM

COMMUNITY CONCERNS AND PARTICIPATION INTEREST SURVEY FOR (NAME OF INSTALLATION)

Name: ___________________________________________________________________________

Address:____________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

 

Telephone number:

Daytime: (___)____________
Home (___)____________

Fax number: (___)_____________

 

PART I: ENVIRONMENTAL INTERESTS AND CONCERNS

 

This portion of the form will give (NAME OF INSTALLATION) a more accurate idea of your environmental interests and concerns regarding restoration activities at the installation.

 

1. Are you affiliated with any group? If so, please list the group(s).

 

2. Do you have any environmental interests in or concerns about (NAME OF INSTALLATION)? If so, please elaborate.

 

3. How would you like the installation to address these interests or concerns?

 

Methods can include, but are not limited to:
___at Restoration Advisory Board meetings.
___at public meetings.
___at availability sessions.
___in fact sheets mailed to me.
___in news releases sent to the local newspapers.
___in letters mailed to me.
___by telephone.
___through community interviews.
___by site tours.

 

4. Would you be interested in being on a mailing list to receive fact sheets, news releases, etc. from the installation about its environmental program?

____Yes, I would like to       ____No, I would not like to be
be on the mailing list. on the mailing list.

____I am already on the mailing list to receive environmental information from the installation.

 

PART II: PARTICIPATION IN RESTORATION ADVISORY BOARD ACTIVITIES

 

Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) members are expected to serve a (1 year, 2 year, etc.) term and attend all RAB meetings. Members who miss three of more consecutive meetings may be asked to resign. Duties and responsibilities will include reviewing and commenting on technical documents and activities associated with the environmental restoration program at (NAME OF INSTALLATION). Members will be expected to be available to the community members and groups they represent to facilitate the exchange of information and/or concerns between the community and the RAB. Participation in the RAB is strictly voluntary and members will not be financially compensated. Members will be selected by a selection panel and will be representative of the diverse interests of the community.

Those who do not serve directly on the RAB can still participate in RAB activities. Interested members of the community will be included on the mailing list and invited to attend all RAB meetings, which are open to the public. Technical documents reviewed by the RAB will be made available to the public through information repositories. The public will be able to comment on the technical documents either in writing to the installation of at the RAB meetings during a time set aside for public comments and input.

 

NOTE: Priority for RAB membership will be given to local residents who are directly impacted/affected.

 

1. Would you like to be considered for RAB membership? If so, please state why.

 

2. Have you had experience working as a member of a diverse group with common goals?

 

3. The community members of the RAB will select the Community Co-Chair. Please indicate if you are interested in being considered for the Community Co-Chair position by checking the box below:

____Yes, I would like to be considered.

 

4. If you responded yes to question 3, please state why you would be interested in being the Community Co-Chair.

 

5. By submitting this signed application, you:

 

- are aware that being a RAB member would involve a set time commitment;

- understand that being a RAB member entails a willingness to work cooperatively with other RAB members to ensure the efficient and effective use of RAB time;

- understand that serving on the RAB will be voluntary and RAB members will not receive compensation for this service; and,

- have read and understand that following Privacy Act information regarding providing your name, address and telephone number for this survey.

 

PRIVACY ACT NOTICE

 

Authority : 10 U.S. Code (USC) 2705(c) and 42 USC 9620(f), state and local participation in cleanup of Federal facilities.

Principal Purpose: To identify members of the local community who are interested in participation in the RAB.

Routine Uses: The requested information will be used to develop a list of interested persons from which the community members of the RAB will be selected. The information will also be used by the Army to contact the individuals who are selected.

Disclosure of the requested information is voluntary. Failure to provide all the requested information may prevent selection to the RAB.

_____________________________________________     ___________________
Applicant Signature                               Date

ATTACHMENT 3

SAMPLE LETTER OF INVITATION

Dear Mr./Ms. Y.:

Fort X will be undergoing environmental studies to determine what, if any, clean up is necessary due to Fort X's past operations. To keep the public informed about and involved in the environmental study process as early as possible, Fort X is planning to establish a Restoration Advisory Board (RAB).

This RAB will enable the affected community and representatives of Government agencies to meet and exchange information about Fort X's environmental restoration program. It will also provide an opportunity for the community to review progress and participate in dialogue with the decision-makers.

Since you are an interested member of Fort X's local community, we would like to extend to you an invitation to attend a meeting about the RAB. The community meeting is scheduled for (DATE AND TIME) at Fort X's auditorium (LOCATION).

Enclosed is a RAB fact sheet and community interest survey. Please bring the survey with you at the meeting or mail it to (ADDRESS) by (DATE).

I hope to see you at the meeting. If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact (NAME OF POC) at XXX-XXXX.

Sincerely,

Fort X Commander

ATTACHMENT 4

SAMPLE FACT SHEET

The U.S. Army is conducting environmental studies and cleanup actions at Army installations nationwide under the Installation Restoration Program. Fort X will be undergoing such a study. To keep the public informed and involved in its cleanup activities and provide opportunities for public involvement in its environmental restoration program, Fort X is planning to establish a Restoration Advisory Board (RAB).

The RAB will enable the affected community and representatives of Government agencies to meet and exchange information about Fort X's environmental program. It will also provide an opportunity for the community to review progress and participate in dialogue with the decision-makers.

The RAB will be an additional community involvement forum for interested people to learn more about the ongoing and future environmental studies and cleanup actions. The RAB will not take the place of Fort X's current public involvement activities; it will be established to supplement them. RAB members will be responsible for:

  • Providing advice on environmental restoration issues to Army installations and regulatory agencies;
  • Holding regular meetings, publicly announced and open to the public, at convenient times and locations;
  • Reviewing, evaluating and commenting on documents;
  • Identifying project requirements;
  • Recommending priorities among sites or projects; and
  • Identifying applicable standards and, consistent with Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), proposing cleanup levels consistent with planned land use.

The RAB will include the Army, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and/or state environmental regulatory representatives, and members of the local community. The Installation Co-Chair will be responsible for:

  • Ensuring that RAB membership reflects diverse interests within the community;
  • Keeping meeting minutes and making them available to interested parties;
  • Developing, maintaining and using a mailing list of names and addresses of people who wish to receive information on the cleanup program; and,
  • Jointly chairing the RAB with a community representative.

Interested citizens who become RAB members should be willing to attend all RAB meetings (which could last between two to four hours each) and be willing to devote ample time to review Army documents within a prescribed time frame.

A community meeting about the proposed RAB is scheduled for (DATE AND TIME) at Fort X's auditorium (LOCATION). Community Concerns and Participation Interest surveys will be distributed at that time and must be returned by (DEADLINE). At the meeting, you will learn about the purpose of the RAB, participation opportunities and member expectations, and hear an update on the status of installation cleanup activities and future plans. For more information, call (NAME OF POC), Fort X, at XXX-XXXX..

ATTACHMENT 5

FORMAT FOR RAB AJOURNMENT REPORT

FORT X

1.0 PURPOSE

State that the purpose of this report is to present adequate information on the environmental restoration activities that support the adjournment of the RAB. State the precise reason for adjournment, which may include one or more of the following:

  • Fort X no longer has an environmental restoration program;
  • All remedies are in place and operating properly and successfully;
  • There is no longer sufficient, sustained community interest.

2.0 INSTALLATION AND SURROUNDING COMMUNITY INFORMATION

2.1 Installation

Include a brief summary of the following:

  • Installation location and size;
  • Installation history;
  • Present and future land use;

2.2 Surrounding Community

Include a brief description of the surrounding community describing the following (as applicable):

  • Residential/industrial/remote;
  • Size of community;
  • Community structure (socio-economic factors impacting community involvement); and
  • Groundwater usage and/or public water supply status.

3.0 ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM

Provide a brief summary of:

  • Discovery of contamination;
  • History of remedial investigations/findings;
  • EPA, state, or local agency involvement; and
  • Regulatory framework for investigation(s) (IRP/BRAC, RCRA, CERCLA, etc.).

3.1 Description of Primary Contamination Sources

Provide brief descriptions of the primary contamination sources including:

  • Nature of contamination;
  • Affected media;
  • Magnitude of contamination;
  • Adverse effects on the environment and to the community; and
  • Present status of remedial response.

Note: The primary contamination sources are those with a major impact on community involvement (i.e., a source of continued groundwater contamination, residual contamination)

3.2 RODs/DDs and Other Remedial Actions

Summarize/list chronologically all of the actions (such as RODs, DDs, RA) that have been approved for the installation. This will indicate that all environmental restoration activities followed a logical path that was consistent with regulatory and community concerns/statutes.

4.0 COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

4.1 Restoration Advisory Board

Summarize all RAB activities to include:

  • Why, how, and when RAB was formed;
  • Past and current RAB members and changes that may have occurred over the course of the RAB involvement;
  • Chronological listing of RAB activities to include items such as defining scope of studies, document review, recommendations, selection of final remedies, resolving community concerns, public meeting dates and notes, funding issues, property transfers, RAB meeting notes, TAPP projects etc.;
  • Documentation pertaining to major decisions taken by RAB during the investigations (addressing community concerns, level of RAB involvement, insufficient interest on part of the community, etc.);
  • Funds expended to date for RAB/Community involvement; and
  • Result of voting or other reason(s) that RAB agrees to adjournment.
  • Discussions indicating how community participation will be conducted after RAB adjournment.

4.2 Other Community Involvement

Identify the Community Relations Plan(s) in effect at the installation. Include any other community activities not covered above (general public meetings, Local Redevelopment Authority involvement, political involvement, past TRC activities, other property transfer activities).

5.0 DECLARATION

Summarize the declaration to state that:

  • Restoration work at the installation has been successfully completed;
  • Federal, state, local, and applicable Army regulations have been adhered to during the restoration;
  • Remediation measures implemented at the site will protect human health and the environment and ongoing remedial measures (such as monitoring) will be periodically evaluated to ensure regulatory compliance; and
  • Community involvement will continue, as necessary.
  • The RAB agreed to adjourn.

If the primary reason for adjournment is lack of sufficient, sustained community interest, a statement must be included which commits the installation to re-evaluate community interest on a periodic basis (recommended every two years).

Close declaration by stating that in light of the above, it is the Installation's decision to adjourn the RAB although the RAB's overall community program will provide for continued stakeholder input into cleanup activities.

6.0 APPROVAL, SIGNATURE, AND DATE

The following personnel will approve and sign the RAB adjournment report:

  • Installation Commander or MACOM Installation Coordinator/MACOM Environmental Coordinator (for BRAC) if there is no Installation Commander.
  • Army/Installation Co-Chair.
  • RAB Community Co-Chair.
  • Installation Representative or BRAC Environmental Coordinator or BRAC Cleanup Team (for BRAC).
  • EPA Representative (if appropriate).
  • State Representative (if appropriate).

ATTACHMENT 6

SAMPLE RAB

ADJOURNMENT REPORT

FORT JOHN WAYNE, NEW HAMPSHIRE

1.0 PURPOSE

This report describes the selected action to adjourn the Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) at Fort John Wayne (FJW), New Hampshire. The RAB is adjourned because all necessary restoration activities have been completed according to state and Federal statutes, including Army Regulation 200-1. The approved Record of Decision (ROD) and applicable Decision Documents (DDs) have been initiated. Information describing the installation, surrounding community, community relations activities, and the environmental restoration process at FJW are provided in support of the decision to adjourn the RAB.

2.0 INSTALLATION AND SURROUNDING COMMUNITY INFORMATION

2.1 Installation

FJW is best known for its rugged outdoor vehicular testing center and its maintenance operations. The installation has been used almost exclusively for these purposes since its inception in 1942. There are over 500 miles of roads and tracks on this 40,000 acre installation. The cantonment area is located near the southern portion of the installation.

The installation is situated in a relatively remote area, surrounded by dense forests. Approximately, 5,000 acres in the southeast portion of the subject property is on the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) List. This includes a small portion of the cantonment area. Under BRAC, this property will be transferred to the local community based on the Reuse Plan developed by the Local Redevelopment Authority (LRA). FJW continues to be an open post and retains its testing and maintenance mission.

2.2 Surrounding Community

Lumber companies own much of the undeveloped land adjacent to the installation boundary. The nearest town, Galena, is located on the banks of the Clear River about two miles to the northeast of the installation boundary. Galena has a population of approximately 586 residents. The majority of these residents work in the lumber industry. Town residents and other local inhabitants obtain their drinking water from an alluvial aquifer hydraulically connected to Clear River. Pleasant Oak is the next closest town to the installation boundary. Its 110 residents are located approximately 7.5 miles to the east.

Tourists frequently visit the nearby state parks. Outdoor activities such as snow-mobiling, hiking, hunting, and fishing are common forms of recreation in the area. An interchange for two interstate highway systems trending both north-south and east-west exists three miles southeast of the installation. The Boston and Maine and Conrail railroads serve the installation.

3.0 ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM

FJW's environmental restoration cleanup program began in 1981 when a Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection was initiated. The Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) phase of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) process was initiated in 1983 and concluded in the fall of 1994. Remedial actions based on the RI/FS began in 1995. In order to protect human health and the environment, a Removal Action was conducted in 1993 at a Motor Pool.

The installation was placed in the BRAC program in 1991 and as a result, other environmental investigations were performed at FJW. These include an Environmental Baseline Survey, completed in 1993, and an Environmental Impact Study for Re-Use which was completed in 1995. Both studies focused primarily on the BRAC parcel.

The environmental restoration program at FJW identified five major sources of contamination on the installation: (1) a Former Pesticide Storage Area; (2) Old Sanitary Landfill; (3) Paint Spray Booth; (4) Construction Landfill; and (5) Motor Pool.

The Motor Pool is situated on a small portion of the 5,000 acres of property to be transferred to the local community. This property has been zoned for commercial/industrial redevelopment, with warehouses and distribution centers expected to comprise the vast majority of existing military buildings. The Local Redevelopment Authority (LRA) plans a like-use for the Motor Pool and surrounding area. The area is currently in process of conversion to a multi-state inter-modal transportation hub serving the New England states and Boston harbor.

3.1 Primary Contamination Sources

3.1.1 Former Pesticide Storage Area

The Former Pesticide Storage Area was an old wood framed building with a hardwood floor. It was used until the mid 1970s and formerly stored a variety of pesticides, which included the insecticides DD (Rhothane), DDT (Chlorophenothane), and the herbicide 2,4,-D (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid).

Remediation Measures Implemented: The wooden structure was demolished and placed in the Construction Landfill. The contaminated soil was excavated and treated using soil washing techniques, which rendered the soil non-toxic as verified by chemical analysis. The soil was returned to the site as clean backfill.

3.1.2 Old Sanitary Landfill

The Old Sanitary Landfill is the original municipal landfill used by the installation between 1942 and 1973. Some of the major hazardous constituents discovered in this 7.5 acre landfill are solvents, heavy metals, and lead acid from discarded automobile batteries.

Remediation Measures Implemented: To reduce leachate generation, the landfill was covered with a multi-layered cap. Long-term monitoring plans, as well as routine maintenance activities, are being implemented at the landfill site. Early sampling events indicated only low levels of contamination below established state standards. Annual sampling is required at the present time until the next project review in July 1999.

3.1.3 Paint Spray Booth

Military vehicles were painted in the Spray Booth area. The area in the immediate vicinity was used for vehicle maintenance and painting activities since the 1950s. Site investigations revealed mainly hydrocarbons had migrated from the site and contaminated the soil and the underlying ground water. The current modern Paint Spray Booth was constructed in 1983.

Remediation Measures Implemented: The RI/FS supported the decision to implement natural attenuation as the remedial option to reduce contaminant concentrations to the acceptable levels set forth by the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES). Continued annual monitoring show that the natural attenuation process is an effective remedial measure for this site to date. The site will be monitored semi-annually to ensure natural attenuation is effective.

3.2.4 Construction Landfill

The Construction Landfill is a 1.5 acre area formerly used to dispose of construction related wastes. Coal-tar creosote from railroad ties, was identified as the major contaminant associated with this site, contaminating both the shallow ground water aquifer and the glacial till subsurface. Asbestos was also identified as a contaminant of concern due to the method of its disposal in the landfill. The landfill continues to be used for the disposal of non-hazardous construction debris.

Remediation Measures Implemented: In the late 1980s asbestos containing material and railroad ties were selectively removed and placed in a landfill approved for their disposal. The creosote contamination was effectively remediated using bioremediation techniques and other innovative technologies.

3.2.5 Motor Pool

The motor pool area is used by the Installation for the maintenance of vehicles. During the early 1980s it was discovered that several underground storage tanks (USTs) containing diesel fuel and gasoline were leaking. Hydrocarbons including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes were discovered in the ground water, as well as in the underlying soil.

Remediation Measures Implemented: In 1993 three 1,000 gallon USTs were excavated and removed. The excavated soil was successfully treated on-site and rendered non-hazardous by using bioremediation techniques. Contaminated ground water was collected via extraction wells and treated utilizing multiple carbon adsorption columns. Current water sampling data from downgradient monitoring wells indicate contaminant concentrations at the site are below Maximum Contaminant Levels.

3.3 RODS / DECISION DOCUMENTS / PROPERTY TRANSFERS

A production well for the installation is located downgradient of the Motor Pool and was at risk of becoming contaminated from the leaking tanks associated with the Motor Pool. As a result of the emergency, an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis and Decision Document were prepared and the cleanup measures undertaken at the site were performed as a short-term removal action. Decision Documents were also created for the other four existing sites. The final ROD was signed in 1995, after having met all the necessary remedial measures at the installation. The ROD requires a review of the groundwater plume associated with the capped landfill every two years.

A Finding of Suitability to Transfer was prepared for the BRAC parcel, in accordance with Army Regulation 200-1 and signed by the Commander, Troop Command in July 1997.

4.0 COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

4.1 Restoration Advisory Board

In 1995, the TRC was converted to a RAB in response to increased public interests and because a portion of the installation was placed on the BRAC list. The RAB reviewed the final ROD pertaining to the cleanup and continued monitoring of the OUs at FJW, and concurred with the LRA's decision to accept the transfer of the BRAC property. The RAB has also reviewed sampling results from the long term monitoring programs in effect.

Since the formation of the RAB is 1995, $15,321 has been spent on administration of the RAB.

All remedial actions have been initiated or completed and since the BRAC parcel has been accepted by the LRA, no significant actions remain for the RAB. On December 5, 1997, the RAB voted 17-0 to adjourn. The installation has agreed to provide quarterly fact sheets concerning ongoing remedial operations and monitoring to all former RAB members, as well as, to community members who request the fact sheets.

A list of all the persons and their titles whom have served on the RAB follows:

Army Installation Members
(01) Todd Eckleman, BRAC Environmental Coordinator
(02) Mark Everring, Installation Co-Chair
(03) Bill Henderson, Public Affairs Officer

 

Federal, State, and Local Agency Members
(04) Martha Evans, NHDES Representative
(05) Kim Lee, EPA Representative
(06) Jerry Stevens, Derry County Commissioner

Community Members
(07) Kathy Schwartz
(08) Ron Anderson
(09) Pete Sanford
(10) Renee Bennet
(11) Zachary Cropp
(12) Kathy Heinz
(13) Rob Hill, Community Co-Chair
(14) Betty Sue Howard
(15) David Kane
(16) Jim Montgomery
(17) Kevin Reynolds
Judy Smith (former member)
Sara Fletcher (former member)
Greg Norman (former member)

4.2 FORMER TECHNICAL REVIEW COMMITTEE (TRC)

A TRC was established in 1988 to review and comment on Army cleanup actions at FJW. The TRC reviewed remedial alternatives and the draft feasibility study for the sites at FJW. With the implementation of the DoD RAB program in 1994, the FJW TRC was converted to a RAB in 1995.

4.3 OTHER COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

A formal Community Relations Plan (CRP) specifying public involvement activities and requirements was written in 1985 and revised in 1995. The CRP has been fully implemented.

The local citizens group known as "Community Watchdogs" has taken considerable interest in the environmental situations occurring a FJW. Several times each year members of the community group will meet with representatives from the FJW Environmental Office and voice concerns and ask questions.

Each year since 1992 there is an Earth Day celebration in which the members of the public have an opportunity to expand their knowledge of the installation's environmental programs. Public feedback regarding the Earth Day activities has been very positive.

4.4 LOCAL REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

LRA was established in 1991 and composed of a state representative, two county representatives and three members each from the towns of Pleasant Oak and Galena. The LRA accepted transfer of the BRAC parcel in July 1997. The BRAC property will serve as part of a multi-state, inter-modal transportation hub serving the New England states and Boston harbor.

4.5 PUBLIC MEETINGS

In accordance with the CRP, public meetings were initiated in 1986. Public meetings have not been required since the final ROD was signed in 1995 and the transfer of the BRAC parcel to the LRA in 1997. The last public meeting was held on June 22, 1997 to discuss the transfer of the BRAC parcel. In attendance were 2 community personnel and 17 government personnel.

5.0 DECLARATION

In light of the facts mentioned below, the RAB will be adjourned.

Remedial actions and other environmental restoration work were successfully completed at the sites identified at FJW, with an exception for some long-term monitoring. The remediation measures implemented were designed to protect human health and the environment, and meet all applicable New

Hampshire and Federal requirements. Two-year reviews for contamination will occur at the Old Sanitary Landfill and the Paint Spray Booth, due to hazardous constituents left in place at these sites. The CRP has been fully implemented. There is no further need for the RAB and the RAB has unanimously voted to adjourn. All steps of the BRAC process have been completed. The LRA accepted transfer of the BRAC parcel in 1997 and the "final ROD" was signed in 1995.

FJW will host a meeting of all former members of the RAB within one month of completion of the two-year review process in order to re-evaluate the success of the long-term cleanup measures and to discuss any future recommended actions. In addition to the former RAB, the public will be notified about this meeting. The next review is scheduled for July 1999.

6.0 APPROVAL, SIGNATURE AND DATE

The following RAB members agree that the RAB at FJW should adjourn.

________________                  _______________
Mark Everring                     Betty Sue Howard
Installation Co-Chair             Community Co-Chair

________________                  _______________
Todd Eckleman                     Kim Lee
BRAC Environmental Coordinator    EPA Representative, Region 1

_______________
Martha Evans
NHDES Representative

APPROVED BY:

________________
E.J. Elliot
Colonel, CM Commanding

ATTACHMENT 7

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE for PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

APPLICATION FORM

Copy of DD Form 2749 can be found on the web at

http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/infomgt/forms/formsprogram.htm

ATTACHMENT 8

RAB/TAPP COST WORKSHEET FOR RAB ADMINISTRATIVE AND TAPP FUNDING

RAB/TAPP COST WORKSHEET FOR RAB ADMINISTRATIVE AND TAPP FUNDING

PROGRAM MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS FOR THE FY IDENTIFIED BY EACH INSTALLATION REQUESTING RAB ADMINISTRATIVE FUNDING.

MACOMS INCLUDE THESE WORKSHEETS WHEN SUBMITTING PROGRAM MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS FOR THE FY TO THE USAEC.

1. ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR DETERMINING INTEREST IN A RAB

FOR EVERY INSTALLATION REQUESTING RAB ADMINISTRATIVE FUNDING THAT DOES NOT HAVE A RAB AND HAS CHECKED "DoD DETERMINING INTEREST" OR "NO COMMUNITY INTEREST" IN DSERTS.

MACOM:_________________________________________________

INSTALLATION: ___________________________________________

1. Initial Efforts Determining interest YES ______ NO _____

2. Routine Follow-up Efforts to monitor changes in Community Interest YES______NO______

3. Community Interest Survey Costs $___________________

4. Advertisements, News Releases and Paid Public Notice Costs $___________________

5. Public Meeting Costs $___________________

6. Poster Station Material Costs $___________________

7. RAB Fact Sheets $___________________

8. Other ______________________________ $___________________

TOTAL $___________________

 

2. ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR ESTABLISHING A RAB

ONE TIME COST FOR EVERY INSTALLATION REQUESTING RAB ADMINISTRATIVE FUNDING TO ESTABLISH A RAB AND HAS CHECKED EITHER "DoD DETERMINING INTEREST" OR HAS A RAB ESTABLISHED DATE IN DSERTS.

MACOM:_________________________________________________

INSTALLATION: _________________________________________

1. Community Interest Survey Costs $___________________

2. Advertisements, New Releases and Paid Public Notice Costs $___________________

3. Letters of Invitations $___________________

4. RAB Fact Sheets $___________________

5. Logistics for Selection Panel Meeting/member selection costs $___________________

6. Other:__________________________________ $___________________

TOTAL $___________________

3. ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR AN ESTABLISHED RAB

EVERY INSTALLATION WITH AN ESTABLISHED RAB AND REOCCURRING RAB ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS AND HAS A RAB ESTABLISHED DATE IN DSERTS.

MACOM:________________________________________________

INSTALLATION:_ ________________________________________

1. Orientation training $________________

2. Meeting Logistics $________________

3. Meeting Materials $_________________

Preparation of Meeting Agendas, Meeting materials, and Meeting minutes

4. Document Reproduction $_________________

5. Other:___________________________________ $_________________

TOTAL $_________________

4. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (TAPP) COSTS

EVERY INSTALLATION WITH AN ESTABLISHED RAB OR TECHNICAL REVIEW COMMITTEE DOCUMENTED IN DSERTS, WHERE COMMUNITY MEMBERS HAVE EXPRESSED REASONABLE NEED FOR TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE. TAPP DOES NOT HAVE TO BE APPROVED BEFORE THE REQUIREMENT IS IDENTIFIED. THE TAPP PROJECT DOES HAVE TO BE APPROVED BEFORE FUNDS CAN BE RELEASED TO THE INSTALLATION.

MACOM:_________________ _______________________________

INSTALLATION: __________________________________________

1. Estimated Cost for TAPP project(s) $_________________

(Not to exceed $25K per year (or 1% of an installation CTC, whichever is less) and $100K for the life of the cleanup program)

2. DESCRIPTION OF POSSIBLE TAPP PROJECT: Provide a brief description of the assistance project that the RAB community members may require. Note any installation that does not provide a reasonable estimate of cost for specific TAPP projects will not be budgeted for TAPP.

 

SUMMARY

MACOM:________ _________________________________________

INSTALLATION: ___________________________________________

1. ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR DETERMINING INTEREST IN A RAB $___________________

2. ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR ESTABLISHING A RAB $___________________

3. ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR AN ESTABLISHED RAB $___________________

4. POTENTIAL TAPP COSTS $___________________

TOTAL $___________________

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